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Anonymous 12/04/2021 (Sat) 04:28:03 No. 5818
Do you enjoy the 90s /late/?
>>5818 wasn't there
no i wasn't there and i hate 90s kids nostalgia. 90s kids are retarded and obsessive and i've listened to their constant dick prancing about how much better shows for 5 year olds were when they were 10. it's half the reason why terrible remakes keep cropping up. worst is when they get nostalgic over something that never disappeared to begin with.
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The early 90's were pretty good, almost like the mid/late 80's. After that things got shitty quick.
Not at all. Might just be due to bad personal experiences, though. All I know for certain is that life started getting good (well, acceptable) for me once I was finally allowed to get online in the mid-00s. That's when the world opened up and I could do more than sit in my room playing with legos and video games.
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>>5818 The '90s were better than the decades that followed in most ways, but a lot of people overdo it with the praise. Also, Buffcoat and Beaver is easily one of my favorite shows. >>5824 I was crapping my diaper in the early '90s, but I've always kind of agreed with this. Even as a kid I noticed how sterile things started to feel as the end of the millennium came closer. There's been a resurgence of interest in the Y2K aesthetic in the past few years, but I still can't really appreciate it. I've always been drawn toward '80s and early '90s pop culture, but the second half of the decade always seemed like a step down to me in most aspects. A lot of the things I was fondest of as a kid were considered old hat at the time, so my positive memories of the '90s are tangled up with the earlier media I enjoyed during my childhood. Since I was in elementary school, I've oddly felt more nostalgia and affection for '80s pop culture than what came later (despite not having lived through any of the decade).
hate to lie, but yeah, the 1990s were pretty nice if you compared it to current times. maybe because was a kid back then, and there aren't constantly more and new distractions. There isn't a desperate need to push things away and slow down your life - life is as slow as you want it to be. Many, if not most, of us poor kids didn't have a computer, less so dial-up internet or cable TV. Bored is only felt after you realised you have rewatch or re-read the same thing for the umpteenth times and literally can recite the whole thing at any given point. There is also, for the most part, a sort of naive-ness that doesn't seem out of place.
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>>5845 I used to go to the library and get new books to read. I used to ride my bike around town, hang out with other kids who had bikes, even go ride to a place on the other side of town that had trails for dirtbikes. Or I'd go to the park and skate (board or rollers, I had both) or kick a ball around. When we went to the countryside for summer vacations I'd go on long bike rides on mostly empty backroads in the mountains. There were other kids there usually to play with also, and fields and farm animals all over the place. Back in the city, I'd go to the track and run, or visit some friends and play D&D. There was basically always something to do, and the only time I was bored is if my family went to a place where they did things with other adults and there weren't any other kids and I was basically expected to sit around and be quiet. I soon learned to bring books with me, or else I'd end up spending hours looking out the window and daydreaming. Also we had these books and other gamebooks long before I got a computer. Kids at school passed them around.
>>5818 I kind of miss it, I kind of don't.
>>5818 BASED beavis poster I'm drunk and I have nobody to say this so I'm gonna say it here: NIGGGGGERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! now that that's out of the way, well yeah I like any period of time prior to the current one because the current one is the worst one in the entire history of humanity. Like this is the gayest humanity has ever been in the, like, million years we've been here. sucking a wooly mammoths hairy ballsac is less gay than the current year
>>5850 anyone remember reading the 3rd planet from altair or something like that? it was one of those choose your adventure books and I always ended up getting myself killed out in space and stuff. honestly it kinda freaked me out sometimes and I would cheat and pretend I dsidn't choose that path
>>5818 I lived in an ex socialist country the 00s for us was basically the 90s of America.
>>5845 I remember that fucking donkey kong 3d animated show 30 years later mainly because there was nothing to do but watch it when it was on on sunday afternoons. The first one, then the repeat two hours later. Awful. >>5850 This is peak childhood and I wish I could go back and un-waste all that time in front of the retard-cube to do those things. Though where I grew up you'd need a car for most of it. >>5818 Yeah, kinda. I have nostalgia for a lot of that shit. I found some VHS cassettes last summer, for example, and had some fun sitting in front of an old TV seeing what was on them. Mostly WWF. I vaguely remember being torn between watching Monday Night Raw and playing Ocarina of Time, so I recorded a few episodes. The actual content isn't as nostalgic as the commercials. The way people looked and dressed. The pre-internet world, where if you were to explain some of the absurdities of the 2020s to a person of that era, they'd rightly call you a fucking loser. >Like, you carry around this device 24/7 so you know when people are talking about you? Enjoy your swirlie, nerd. Then again, I think back to sitcoms of that era like "Friends" (which in theory embodies the archetypal '90s twentysomething) and not only do I find nothing to be nostalgic for, it's mostly the same shit that I sometimes have to endure watching or overhearing when spending time with my mother: sub-mediocre people saying things that would repulse the audience if not for the laugh track. There are things we've lost and which are to our detriment as a culture, but a lot of it is obviously just a step along the path that led us to this horrible period.
>Do you enjoy the 90s /late/? That was a time I went through as a kid. Was nice because no internet, no social medias. Things were still simple but at the same time it was starting to smell the shit of the next decades. I was a kid so things looked so simple at this time, but also difficult because I never was the carefree kind of kid. From almost 15 years I have a bedtime routine : eating a bowl of cereals and watching some old Simpsons episodes before sleeping. I think it's because it reminds me some times were things were simple at home.
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Very much.
>>5818 I enjoyed a lot of 90s shows but I think "90s kids" are retarded. The over-obsessive nostalgia just let to a bunch of shitty remakes and reboots we didn't need. That said, I do miss some aspects of pre-smartphone/internet meme culture, or just being young in general with no responsibilities.
>>6956 >I enjoyed a lot of 90s shows but I think "90s kids" are retarded. I'm admittedly nostalgic for the '90s, but a lot of the things that people my age are nostalgic for I can't really relate to. Renaissance-era Disney movies? Those were part of the '90s, but there's not much about them that makes me feel wistful about the old days. Nintendo 64 and PlayStation games? I had a Nintendo 64 at the time but generally preferred my older consoles and would have rather been playing PC games than anything else. I'll concede that Bomberman 64 makes me feel nostalgic looking back, but back then I would have rather been playing Command & Conquer and don't feel the need to revisit much on the 5th generation consoles. >The over-obsessive nostalgia just let to a bunch of shitty remakes and reboots we didn't need. That's a problem with '80s pop culture too. I'm so sick of people eating up complete shit capitalizing on old media properties they enjoy. Just enjoy the old stuff and keep the memory alive instead of throwing money at inferior retreads and followups just because something comes along wearing the clothes of something you liked back in the day.
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Remakes and reboots are obvious money-grabs, but sometimes you can find open-source Mario clones or whatever and sometimes those are fun to play. Otherwise I mostly stick with emulators or game engines that try to stay faithful to the original (like Chocolate Doom).
You do go to https://anon.cafe/retro, don't you?
>>6968 I agree completely. Things like that are one of the few ways I'll credit the Current Year with having a leg up on the past.
>>5818 Despite being as socially inept as they come, I had friends, was even briefly engaged, had some pretty good jobs (yes, I was a wagie, one with enough downtime to teach myself a programming language and dick around in Solaris a bunch)... I hate to be yet another generic media nostalgia guy, but I really did like Daria, Magic Knight Rayearth and Contact, plus rocking out to Cypress Hill, ATCQ and The Cranberries... ...yeah, if I could relive the 90s, I would.
I'm more particular to the early 00's as I had grown up by then (and I didn't have the Internet at home until I was close to graduating high school years after 9/11), but there's plenty of 90's kid in me. All that time on the SNES, PS1, and PS2, before that BBS sharewares (mostly Apogee) on a PC running MS-DOS with 4mg RAM (mostly cRPGs; I ate up nearly every Final Fantasy there was). And the rest of my non-school time watching DBZ, Star Trek TNG and VOY (DS9 was 2deep4me, now it's my favorite), and Discovery and National Geographic and other nature documentaries.
>>7315 Forgot to mention I'd read hundreds of books from both my school and the local library. I used to be able to consume 1000-page novels in days.
>>6961 >That's a problem with '80s pop culture too. I'm partially guilty as I do enjoy synthwave which often tries to capture 80s nostalgia (or nostalgia in general), but I also know it's not real 80s music. Personally I prefer the songs that just create their own aesthetic without trying too hard to be 80s. >>6968 >>6978 Sometimes just even having mods for older games is an advantage, especially translations for foreign games that never made it to your region.
>>7315 I'm not that fond of the early 2000s culturally in comparison to the prior couple of decades, but there was still some holdover from the '90s (at least where I lived; people in my area didn't necessarily keep up with the latest technology). That was probably the last time I could go into Wal-Mart or Best Buy or wherever and find PC games that interested me pretty regularly. It seemed like there was still good stuff coming out all the time, and the Internet felt like it was getting better and better. >>7432 >I'm partially guilty as I do enjoy synthwave which often tries to capture 80s nostalgia (or nostalgia in general), but I also know it's not real 80s music. Personally I prefer the songs that just create their own aesthetic without trying too hard to be 80s. I like some of that stuff as long as it gets the overall feeling right. Capturing a similar atmosphere is more important to me than using period-accurate hardware or whatever. I strongly prefer a more wistful sound to the more edgy and aggressive stuff. >Sometimes just even having mods for older games is an advantage, especially translations for foreign games that never made it to your region. Relatively minor tweaks can make a huge difference. ECWolf's map feature comes to mind. I don't know if I could ever go back to the days of playing Wolfenstein without a map like I did back when I'd play the original on floppy disk.
>>7448 >I'm not that fond of the early 2000s culturally in comparison to the prior couple of decades, but there was still some holdover from the '90s One thing I liked was that a lot of 90s shows were still airing in reruns on their respective networks through at least the mid-2000s. It gave a nice mix of old and new. That was a benefit of cable though, because I remember broadcast networks (especially for the short saturday morning blocks for kids) almost always pushed for new shows. At best you could see episodes from a currently airing show within the last couple years, aside from rare occasions like early Kids WB airing classic Looney Tunes.
>>7449 You're definitely right. I only got cable in 2001, but for a few years after that I remember channels still playing a lot of older stuff. I remember getting up early on Saturday mornings to watch Looney Tunes (and hopefully catch the Boomerang content Cartoon Network used to air). There was that show Toon Heads that would air old cartoons, and I remember being disappointed when they took that off the air. I remember Tom and Jerry being on all the time too. Toon Disney used to air a ton of syndicated '90s shows. I got really into the History Channel, and a lot of the things that stuck with me were shows that started airing pre-2000. Then, of course, there was TV Land. I was probably exposed to about as many older shows as I was newer ones before I had cable, but that's because my family had a lot of stuff either recorded off cable TV or would otherwise get it on VHS. The A-Team was my favorite show, but I only ever got to watch it as hand-me-down tapes recorded off FX. It's a shame that most channels don't play older content anymore. I gradually began to lose interest in TV in the mid 2000s, but 2007 was the year I finally gave up on it as anything more than background noise. Since then I just started streaming anything I've had any real interest in, which really isn't much.
>>7470 Boomerang was one of my favorite networks to watch growing up. It had so many classic cartoons that I was almost always watching something new. I would've watched it more but at some point Time Warner put it behind a paywall for premium channels. (A bunch of networks my parents watched were also affected at the time. We didn't feel like paying extra so we just lost them.) Also, Boomerang had some of the best network bumpers in TV history. (I still love the Kids WB bumpers with the water tower, but Boomerang's are timeless. Even my first time watching some of those shows I felt a sense of nostalgia. That's really what the network was originally about.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koaQSOTH8oY One other nice benefit was that I could occasionally watch shows with my parents, uncles, etc because they grew up on some of those shows. They couldn't believe I enjoyed Jetsons, Flintstones, Jonny Quest, Scooby Doo, etc. It's a shame Cartoon Network doesn't capitalize on current millenial nostalgia and air shows from the 90s to the mid-2000s within designated blocks and use similar CN bumpers from those eras. Now they just dump a bunch of recent shows on there and make it a worse CN. At the very least they could keep Boomerang a classics-only network and just make a Cartoon Network 2 if they want a modern dumping ground.
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>>7315 BBS were comfy. Unfortunately I didn't get into them until like '94 and the next year I got Internet through my school so I dropped out of the BBS scene altogether. The 90's is an interesting period in that at the start of the decade, few people had computers or Internet, and at the end a ton of people did (at least in western countries). And the types of computers changed dramatically too. In the early 90's a lot of people were using 8-bit systems, Atari ST and Amiga. But when Win95 came out, that changed the market dramatically, and by the end of the decade almost everyone had Windows PCs. Also the demoscene was the shit in late 80's and early 90's. When hardware got more advanced and 3D GPUs happened, it seems much less interesting to me.
>>7472 >Boomerang was one of my favorite networks to watch growing up. It had so many classic cartoons that I was almost always watching something new. I would've watched it more but at some point Time Warner put it behind a paywall for premium channels. (A bunch of networks my parents watched were also affected at the time. We didn't feel like paying extra so we just lost them.) Boomerang was the only channel outside of my cable package that I ever wanted to have. I had to settle for the sample programming block Cartoon Network would air early on Saturday Mornings. I remember catching things like The Herculoids and the original Space Ghost show that I never would have seen otherwise. >They couldn't believe I enjoyed Jetsons, Flintstones, Jonny Quest, Scooby Doo, etc. I liked all those shows as a kid. I remember my uncle coming over to my house once with a VHS tape filled with Jonny Quest episodes we watched together. I even remember liking Jetsons: The Movie when I was really little, which was supposedly terrible. I don't remember and of it nowadays. >It's a shame Cartoon Network doesn't capitalize on current millenial nostalgia and air shows from the 90s to the mid-2000s within designated blocks and use similar CN bumpers from those eras. Now they just dump a bunch of recent shows on there and make it a worse CN. At the very least they could keep Boomerang a classics-only network and just make a Cartoon Network 2 if they want a modern dumping ground. I would have preferred a classic Boomerang channel with the same kind of focus as the original channel and then an offshoot channel or two (with each focusing on a different era). They could have had one focusing more on '80s and early '90s shows for later Gen-Xers and early millennials and then one for the mid '90s through the Cartoon Cartoons era that would generally appeal more to later millennials. I feel like a big part of my generational disconnect from zoomers and even millennials my age is how much older media I ended up consuming during the formative parts of my life. It seems like it was pretty normal for kids around my age to watch some of the shows I did considering how much exposure they were still getting, but not necessarily to the extant I did. I feel lucky, since zoomers seem to have been shafted by the way so much older media has practically been memoryholed in favor of either remakes and cash-ins or newer properties entirely.
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I didn't exist in the 90s and my earliest memories are from 2005/6 at the earliest, but I truly feel like I missed out on something great. Like others said it's mostly the atmosphere of the era that I enjoy the most: >computers becoming cheap enough for general usage >internet requires a brain to set up and use >online users were dedicated to what they discussed >early internet was like someone had cloned the entirety of human existence, you had your physical reality but now you have your digital one as well, and it's the wild west where people are still trying to work out how this shit works >because of this and the fall of any substantial threat in the world (USSR), unprecedented time of growth and prosperity >people would still interact in person quite often, word-of-mouth was how people got the bulk of their info >everything felt "natural" for lack of a better term with all that being said however i'm also not a rose-colored glasses retard that worships a specific time period no matter what happened during it. 90s had plenty of bullshit to deal with too, like USA fucking with civil liberties at Ruby Ridge and Waco, the shitshow of the LA riots and the OJ trial which basically gave the darkies their first free pass to get uppity with no repercussions, eastern europe experiencing a decade-long political hangover after getting out of the USSR with no backup plan (Russia and Yugoslavia especially), Clintons allowing jobs to be shipped overseas and gradually becoming more reliant on China, etc. But I will still say without any doubt that I would rather live in the late 90s/early 00s than CY + 7. Given the choice I'd pick any decade other than the 10s/20s, really. I just want out.
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>>5850 Found that book in my mom's attic!
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Not that I was there but I enjoy older 90's media content mostly because the things I hate about current year didn't exist back then. I assume this is true for most people.
>>8114 That's certainly one reason why a lot of people have their "nostalgia". Typically most people don't really long for these forms of media but rather for the time period where a lot of the problems of today didn't exist.
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>>8140 I still like them. Actually I simply never cared about the new stuff the industry was pushing. So basically I just stayed with the old stuff, or alternatives (such as Linux instead of Windows 95).
>>8145 I agree. I liked old stuff and new stuff until I realized that no matter what was coming out, I always seemed to prefer the old stuff anyway and that things that were coming out were becoming less and less appealing to me. Around 2006 or 2007 I finally decided that there really wasn't much coming out that had much of anything to offer to me.
>>8146 >Around 2006 or 2007 I finally decided that there really wasn't much coming out that had much of anything to offer to me I can definitely relate to this. I stopped buying new video games in 2006 and by 2007 had no hope left for the future of things. I hated where everything and everyone was heading with social media as none of my friends would get on the forums we spent time on, IRC, or anything else we used to do together. It was all about MySpace, Bebo, and Facebook. I even had a lot of people that I used to hang out with get rid of their desktops for laptops and eventually those for smartphones. Which caused a rift between our friendships. I lost friends one by one to the "new normal" that was happening in the late 2000s early 2010s. My last friend finally caved in back in 2019 to get a phone after never owning any type of cell phone his entire life. Instantly thought of himself as better than me after almost 20 years of friendship because I never gave in to the societial pressures of what everyone else was doing. I understand how awful the shit is from a privacy/security standpoint and don't want anything to ever do with it. Not sure if this just means I have a solid standpoint of what I enjoy in life but I have pretty much the exact same interests and mindset as I did in the late 90s/early 2000s. I doubt it'll ever change even with my dying breath.
>>8149 If you ever find yourself needing the convinience of a smartphone, I'd recommend getting and older Pixel phone and flashing GrapheneOS on it, but it seems like you're pretty set in stone without modern technology, which is somewhat admirable. kudos based anon
>>8150 I don't leave the house too often and whenever I do I usually allow that to be my time away from the internet. If there's any information or anything else that I may need to know before leaving I always make sure to do enough research or have the resources as a mental note beforehand. If I need something to do while being out I usually just take everything in by being out of the house. If I have something with me though, it's usually just my camera, a book, and/or some sort of a handheld usually being my PSP that I have cfw running on.

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